17-22 July 2016
Master Cutlers Hall
Europe/London timezone

Strategies for a directional detection of Dark Matter.

21 Jul 2016, 12:40
20m
Venue: Cutlers' Main Hall (First Floor); Chair: Yoichiro Suzuki; Session Managers: Jost Migenda & Frederic Mouton ()

Venue: Cutlers' Main Hall (First Floor); Chair: Yoichiro Suzuki; Session Managers: Jost Migenda & Frederic Mouton

Speaker

Dr. Camille Couturier (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie-Grenoble (Grenoble-Alpes University/CNRS))

Description

The directional detection of Dark Matter (DM) proposes to use the existing anisotropy in the angular distribution of the DM-induced recoils in the galactic coordinates to distinguish it from mostly isotropic background. This anisotropy arises naturally from the relative motion of the Solar system within the DM halo. Several techniques have been proposed for a directional detection, including emulsion plates, crystal scintillators, low-pressure gaseous TPCs, columnar recombination in high-pressure gaseous Xenon TPCs, solid-state detectors, DNA-based detectors and graphene-based heterostructures. After a brief review of these strategies, we will discuss the motion of an ion recoiling due to the elastic scattering by a DM particle. Monte-Carlo simulations can be used to emulate this motion in different sensing materials. We propose a new figure of merit to measure the preservation of the initial direction information in a given detecting material, allowing a quantitative comparison of the different directional detection strategies.

Primary authors

Dr. Camille Couturier (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie-Grenoble (Grenoble-Alpes University/CNRS)) Dr. Daniel Santos (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie-Grenoble (Grenoble-Alpes University/CNRS))

Co-authors

Dr. Fabrice Naraghi (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie-Grenoble (Grenoble-Alpes University/CNRS)) Mr. Jean-Philippe Zopounidis (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie-Grenoble (Grenoble-Alpes University/CNRS))

Presentation Materials

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